notcisjustwoman:

thekardraculans:

notcisjustwoman:

Watch this rape-mongering handmaiden try to justify her misogyny when the feminists at the University of Toronto decide to put an end to violent, rape promoting hate speech on their campus.

i like the part in this post where you display exactly the type of attitude she’s talking about

if you critique feminism, you obviously HATE women because logic don’t real

I like the part of your post where you let us all know that you’re a misogynist shitfuck.

aww that’s so cute you’re doing it again and you don’t even understand why because you’re so far up your asshole to understand how logic works anymore. i feel kinda sorry for you and everyone who has the misfortune to know you.

posted: 3 days ago
with: 23 notes
When you talk about safe spaces, it almost always becomes a tool to enforce compliance with particular ideological demands and to silence those who disagree."
— Janice Fiamengo (via imminentdeathsyndrome)

posted: 3 days ago
with: 44 notes
imminentdeathsyndrome:

The German term Fremdscham describes a type of proxy-embarrassment; it’s the feeling of shame you have on behalf of others, often those who don’t realize they should be embarrassed for themselves. I can’t think of a term that better applies to the scene that unfolded at the University of Ottawa two weeks ago.
Professor Janice Fiamengo had planned to speak on men’s issues and rape culture as part of a talk organized by the Canadian Association for Equality (CAFE). The lecture, called “What’s Equality Got To Do With It? Men’s Issues and Feminism’s Double Standards,” was intended to dispel the notion of rape culture, according to Fiamengo, as well as discuss issues such as suicide by young men and custody rights after divorce. But some student activists decided Fiamengo’s lecture was not appropriate, so they took it upon themselves to shut it down.
The entire display is chronicled in a 50-minute YouTube video that shows protesters booing, yelling and blowing a vuvuzela throughout Fiamengo’s attempted address. The lecture organizer tried to reason with protesters, but it didn’t work. Campus security tried to intervene, with little success. Finally, the event moved to another room, but shortly after, the fire alarm went off.
According to the student newspaper the Fulcrum, a group that calls itself the Revolutionary Student Movement (RSM) was behind the protest.

“We feel that these ideas have no place on our campus and refuse to legitimize them by allowing them space to organize,” a representative for the RSM wrote in an email to the paper. “As was demonstrated, campus security will not protect our community from events that are harmful to men, women, and trans people in the community, so we decided to stand up for what we feel is right.”

Hold on — ideas have no place on campus? Surely, they can’t be serious.
Alas, the irony of unilaterally deciding “what is right” is apparently lost on this vocal group of freedom fighters. Indeed, they haul out the notion of “safe space,” which is commonly used as a defence for quieting speakers that the loudest few on campus don’t want to hear. And they take it upon themselves to “protect” the apparently feeble campus community from the perils of intellectually challenging ideas.
The same shoddy rationale was employed by protesters at Massachusetts’ Brandeis University, which was recently pressured into forgoing plans to award an honourary degree to women’s rights activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali. Ali’s personal history is a remarkable testament to resilience — she was genitally mutilated at age five and became a refugee to flee an arranged marriage, yet still rose to become a distinguished member of Parliament, public speaker and author. But her ongoing criticism of Islam, which she has called “imbued with violence,” was deemed “hateful” by a self-appointed group of safe-space-keepers at Brandeis University, and the administration shamefully caved to their demands and revoked their invitation. Rex Murphy summed up the miserable picture in his weekend column, asking, “Is this what Western thought and philosophy at the university has come to — setting up intellectual quarantines lest the immature and frightened be made uncomfortable or to feel unwelcome? Is this university or daycare?”
At the University of Ottawa, where protesters resorted to clapping, yelling and blowing a horn to drown out professor Fiamengo’s speech on rape culture and men’s issues, the answer is self-evident. The case could be made that Fiamengo’s rejection of rape culture, for example, is unhelpful to efforts to help victims of campus violence come forward, but just because protesters attempt to drown out her ideas doesn’t mean they’re not still there. They are — and they have been left unchallenged — because the Revolutionary Student Movement would rather bang on their desks in a futile, overgrown temper tantrum than actually refute her argument with contrary views.
Much ink has been spilled on the notion that contemporary young girls are reluctant to call themselves feminists, a term that they associate with angry, bra-less man-haters of their mother’s or grandmother’s generation. The foolish antics by protesters at the University of Ottawa don’t help to dispel that characterization. If the new women’s movement is about shutting down critical discussion about both men and women, it can count out a whole slew of supporters right now. The protesters at the University of Ottawa buried their message in their behaviour, which was juvenile, counterproductive and thoroughly embarrassing. And if they’re not embarrassed, I am on their behalf.
Source»

imminentdeathsyndrome:

The German term Fremdscham describes a type of proxy-embarrassment; it’s the feeling of shame you have on behalf of others, often those who don’t realize they should be embarrassed for themselves. I can’t think of a term that better applies to the scene that unfolded at the University of Ottawa two weeks ago.

Professor Janice Fiamengo had planned to speak on men’s issues and rape culture as part of a talk organized by the Canadian Association for Equality (CAFE). The lecture, called “What’s Equality Got To Do With It? Men’s Issues and Feminism’s Double Standards,” was intended to dispel the notion of rape culture, according to Fiamengo, as well as discuss issues such as suicide by young men and custody rights after divorce. But some student activists decided Fiamengo’s lecture was not appropriate, so they took it upon themselves to shut it down.

The entire display is chronicled in a 50-minute YouTube video that shows protesters booing, yelling and blowing a vuvuzela throughout Fiamengo’s attempted address. The lecture organizer tried to reason with protesters, but it didn’t work. Campus security tried to intervene, with little success. Finally, the event moved to another room, but shortly after, the fire alarm went off.

According to the student newspaper the Fulcrum, a group that calls itself the Revolutionary Student Movement (RSM) was behind the protest.

We feel that these ideas have no place on our campus and refuse to legitimize them by allowing them space to organize,” a representative for the RSM wrote in an email to the paper. “As was demonstrated, campus security will not protect our community from events that are harmful to men, women, and trans people in the community, so we decided to stand up for what we feel is right.”

Hold on — ideas have no place on campus? Surely, they can’t be serious.

Alas, the irony of unilaterally deciding “what is right” is apparently lost on this vocal group of freedom fighters. Indeed, they haul out the notion of “safe space,” which is commonly used as a defence for quieting speakers that the loudest few on campus don’t want to hear. And they take it upon themselves to “protect” the apparently feeble campus community from the perils of intellectually challenging ideas.

The same shoddy rationale was employed by protesters at Massachusetts’ Brandeis University, which was recently pressured into forgoing plans to award an honourary degree to women’s rights activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali. Ali’s personal history is a remarkable testament to resilience — she was genitally mutilated at age five and became a refugee to flee an arranged marriage, yet still rose to become a distinguished member of Parliament, public speaker and author. But her ongoing criticism of Islam, which she has called “imbued with violence,” was deemed “hateful” by a self-appointed group of safe-space-keepers at Brandeis University, and the administration shamefully caved to their demands and revoked their invitation. Rex Murphy summed up the miserable picture in his weekend column, asking, “Is this what Western thought and philosophy at the university has come to — setting up intellectual quarantines lest the immature and frightened be made uncomfortable or to feel unwelcome? Is this university or daycare?”

At the University of Ottawa, where protesters resorted to clapping, yelling and blowing a horn to drown out professor Fiamengo’s speech on rape culture and men’s issues, the answer is self-evident. The case could be made that Fiamengo’s rejection of rape culture, for example, is unhelpful to efforts to help victims of campus violence come forward, but just because protesters attempt to drown out her ideas doesn’t mean they’re not still there. They are — and they have been left unchallenged — because the Revolutionary Student Movement would rather bang on their desks in a futile, overgrown temper tantrum than actually refute her argument with contrary views.

Much ink has been spilled on the notion that contemporary young girls are reluctant to call themselves feminists, a term that they associate with angry, bra-less man-haters of their mother’s or grandmother’s generation. The foolish antics by protesters at the University of Ottawa don’t help to dispel that characterization. If the new women’s movement is about shutting down critical discussion about both men and women, it can count out a whole slew of supporters right now. The protesters at the University of Ottawa buried their message in their behaviour, which was juvenile, counterproductive and thoroughly embarrassing. And if they’re not embarrassed, I am on their behalf.

Source»

posted: 3 days ago
with: 1153 notes

notcisjustwoman:

Watch this rape-mongering handmaiden try to justify her misogyny when the feminists at the University of Toronto decide to put an end to violent, rape promoting hate speech on their campus.

i like the part in this post where you display exactly the type of attitude she’s talking about

if you critique feminism, you obviously HATE women because logic don’t real

posted: 3 days ago
with: 23 notes

posted: 3 weeks ago
with: 14 notes
biglaw25:

Bitches be like…

biglaw25:

Bitches be like…

posted: 3 weeks ago
with: 16 notes

posted: 1 month ago
with: 87457 notes

gay8:

Lathan Vargason

posted: 1 month ago
with: 330 notes

aresnakesreal:

quick question. how did the beatles not get mixed up about which one they were

posted: 1 month ago
with: 457 notes

filharmagic:

deersatan:

I STILL CANT BELIEVE  THE LONGEST PIECE OF LITERATURE EVER IS A SUPER SMASH BROS BRAWL FANFICTION

it’s longer than war and peace and les mis combined, plus two pride and prejudices.

it trumps the world record for longest piece of literature by over two million words.

(Source: asterkid)

safaribrowser:

emoij:

when your friend has a really shitty opinion 

image

When your significant other chooses a bee over you

image

(Source: emoij)

(Source: subtubitles)

(Source: riced0ll)

saddestblogger:

saddestblogger:

my former algebra teacher puts a stamp of her own face onto your quiz or test if you get a perfect score

i shit you not

image

(Source: saddestblogger)

beyoncempire:

when did i use that tag

beyoncempire:

when did i use that tag

(Source: beyoncempire)

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